Last edited by Brasida
Thursday, January 30, 2020 | History

2 edition of Eusebius, the Phoenician. found in the catalog.

Eusebius, the Phoenician.

Christopher Webb

Eusebius, the Phoenician.

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  • 12 Currently reading

Published by Funk & Wagnalls in New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Vikings -- Fiction.

  • About the Edition

    As a reward for bringing his dead captain"s ship back to Norway, Eusebius is given a crew to help him search for the cup of life. These are his adventures during that search.

    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsPZ7.W363 Eu
    The Physical Object
    Pagination188 p.
    Number of Pages188
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL5683821M
    LC Control Number69015432

    A work entitled "On the Names of Places in the Holy Scriptures," an alphabetical list of place names, is still in existence. What anxiety do you imagine this desire of yours has caused me? The testimony to their antiquity is drawn from the Chronography of Africanus, and from Tatian, Clement, and Josephus. The tables of the second part have been completely preserved in a Latin translation by Jerome, and both parts are still extant in an Armenian translation.

    The former died a virgin: but by the advice of Athena and Hermes Kronos made a sickle and a spear of iron. Now when they were all assembled, it appeared evident that the proceeding was the work of Godinasmuch as men who had been most widely separated, not merely in sentiment but also personally, and by difference of country, place, and nation, were here brought together, and comprised within the walls of a the Phoenician. book city, forming as it were a vast garland of priestscomposed of a variety of the choicest flowers. This he adorned with a pavement of finely polished stone, and enclosed it on three sides with porticos of great length. But the inner part of the roof, which was finished with sculptured panel work, extended in a series of connected compartments, like a vast sea, over the whole church; and, being overlaid throughout with the purest gold, caused the entire building to glitter as it were with rays of light. Indeed, what other feelings could possess their minds, when they witnessed the thorough uncleanness concealed beneath the fair exterior of the objects of their worship? Thus did Helena Augusta, the pious mother of a pious emperor, erect over the two mystic caverns these two noble and beautiful monuments of devotion, worthy of everlasting remembrance, to the honor of God her Saviour, and as proofs of her holy zealreceiving from her son the aid of his imperial power.

    They wore sandals, and loose tunic type clothing. This allegory, then, was thus conveyed by means of the colors of a picture: and I am filled with wonder at the intellectual greatness of the emperor, who as if by divine inspiration thus expressed what the prophets had foretold concerning this monster, saying that God would bring his great and strong and terrible sword against the dragon, the flying serpent; and would destroy the dragon that was in the sea. Eusebius, an admirer of Origen, was reproached by Eustathius for deviating from the Nicene faith. Memoire sur l'Origine et le Caractere veritable de l'Histoire phenicienne qui porte le nom de Sanchoniathon, p. Church historians were able to copy him, but they could not supply his place.


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Eusebius, the Phoenician. book

In fact, Phoenician History contained in his book is the oldest non-coded document of the Western World's historical archives. Those earlier authors had in fact adopted the very same method which Eusebius announced as distinctive of his own work.

A gap in the text is followed by Mot complaining that Ba'al has given Mot his own brothers to eat, the sons of his mother to consume.

Chapter 3. From others again the venerable statues of brass, of which the superstition of antiquity had boasted for a long series of years, were exposed to view in all the public places of the imperial city: so that here a Pythian, there a Sminthian Apollo, excited the contempt of the beholder: while the Delphic tripods were deposited in the hippodrome and the Muses of Helicon in the palace itself.

No wonder, then, if I affirm that your maintenance of the truth has tended rather to promote your security than to draw on you the hatred of others. Redpath, by whose many useful suggestions and careful correction of the proof-sheets I have been aided throughout; to Dr. To do full justice to so large a compilation from all branches of ancient literature the editor himself should be historian, poet, philosopher, archaeologist, astronomer, ethnologist; and I certainly am none of these.

Eusebius was acquainted with the Priest Dorotheus in Antioch, who may have given him exegetical instruction. The contents are as follows: Book i: detailed introduction on Jesus Christ Book ii: The history of the apostolic time to the destruction of Jerusalem by Titus Book iii: The following time to Trajan Books iv and v: the second century Book vi: The time from Septimius to Decius Book vii: extends to the outbreak of the persecution under Diocletian Book viii: more of this persecution Book ix: history to Constantine's victory over Maxentius in the West and over Maximinus in the East Book x: The reestablishment of the churches and the rebellion and conquest of Licinius.

The life of Constantine was compiled after the death of the emperor and the election of his sons as Augusti In the third century, the eclectic teacher Mani developed a religious system based on a dualistic theology that rejected the sensible world as evil and affirmed the spiritual world as good.

But they knew no other gods than those of nature, sun, and moon, and the rest of the wandering stars, and the elements and things connected with them, so that some of their gods were mortal and some immortal. Accordingly they brought a quantity of earth from a distance with much labor, and covered the entire spot; then, having raised this to a moderate height, they paved it with stone, concealing the holy cave beneath this massive mound.

We are equally indebted for their preservation to Eusebius, to whose accuracy and fidelity Diels Proleg. Bishop Lightfoot in the article already referred to writes with just indignation: 'It was either a blundering literalism or an ignoble sarcasm, which led Photius Ep.

Philo's most famous labor was to translate from his native language the works of a certain Sanchuniathon, for whose writings and biography he was perhaps the only Source. It was chiefly the impression produced by this mass of learning which led Scaliger to describe it as "divini commentarii," and Cave to call it "opus profecto nobilissimum" H.

Church historians were able to copy him, but they could not supply his place. And he was also called Zeus Meilichios. And these deities they suppose to regulate the whole world.

For he who was God with us had submitted to be born even in a cave of the earth, and the place of his nativity was called Bethlehem by the Hebrews. He never, for example, raised the ire of Ephrem, and there is good reason to suppose that this represents tacit approval of the emphasis Tatian gave to asceticism.

Sanday, whose counsel and encouragement first led me to add to the English translation a revised text; to Dr.

An edition of the Septuagint seems to have been already prepared by Origen, which, according to Jeromewas revised and circulated by Eusebius and Pamphilus.Eusebius, the bishop of Emesa (c. ) is today not a well-known figure of late ancient Christianity. Yet he achieved apparent notoriety in antiquity: he was a student of the famous Eusebius of Caesarea, he was connected to the entourage of the emperor Constantius, he had earned the.

Phoenician Chronology. From Eusebius “Preparation for the Gospel” BOOK 1 CHAPTER IX-X [PORPHYRY] ‘Of the affairs of the Jews the truest history, because the most in accordance with their places and names, is that of Sanchuniathon of Berytus, who received the records from Hierombalus the priest of the god Ieuo; he dedicated his history to Abibalus king of Berytus, and was approved by him.

Sanchoniatho's Phoenician History Translated from the First Book of Eusebius de Praeparatione Evangelica: With a Continuation of Sanchoniatho's History by Eratosthenes Cyrenaeus's Canon.

av Richard Cumberland, Squier Payne, Sanchuniathon. Inbunden Engelska, Köp. But from Phoenician history, by employing the testimony of those who have written on Phoenician affairs, he proves that the Temple in Jerusalem had been built by King Solomon a hundred and forty-three years and eight months earlier than the foundation of Carthage by the Tyrians: then he passes on, and quotes from the history of the Chaldaeans.

Excerpt from Sanchoniatho's Phoenician History: Translated From the First Book of Eusebius De Praeparatione Evangelica; With a Continuation of Sanchoniatho's History by Eratosthenes Cyrenaeus's Canon, Which Dicaearchus Connects With the First OlympiadAuthor: Sanchuniathon Sanchuniathon.

Life of Constantine (Book III)

Book/Printed Material Sanchoniatho's Phoenician history: translated from the first book of Eusebius De praeparatione evangelica: with a continuation of Sanchoniatho's history by Eratosthenes Cyrenaeus's canon, which Dicaearchus connects with the first olympiad: these authors are illustrated with many historical and chronological remarks, proving them to contain a series of Phoenician and.